Flags of the Revolution Part V (Part, the Last)

IMG_3057OK, I’ve got one more historical flag left in my collection that relates to the Revolution. It’s the Gadsden flag. Some people know it as the “Snake” flag, or the “Don’t Tread on Me” flag. General Gadsden was the designer of the flag. Congress appointed some Marines to go along with Washington’s Navy (see the Washingston’s Cruisers flag), and those Marines carried this flag. It flies today in downtown Spruce Head America, and this flag is a particular favorite of Mrs. Batty.

Flags of the Revolution, the Fourth (the IVth), The Taunton Flag

We talked briefly about ensigns yesterday. A ensign is a flag flown on ships used toIMG_3051 show the nation of origin. At the time of the revolution, the British used an ensign of the Union Jack as the canton, and a field of red. It was also known as Queen Anne’s flag, and when Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, it was under this flag. Apparently, in Taunton Massachusetts in 1774, and band from the Sons of Liberty raised a flag based on the British ensign with the words “Liberty and Union” sewed on it.

To me, this solidifies the idea the patriots weren’t just about breaking the noose of British authority. Yes, they wanted liberty, but they wanted it within the union of a British colony. I don’t think independence was the first thing on their mind; it was equality. Had it been given them, I think we might be seeing a much different globe today.

I like to fly the Taunton flag a lot, for the same reasons I like to fly Frankin’s “Join or Die.” We as Americans seem so divided. I appeal to heaven that we would have both liberty and union.

Flags of the Revolution, Day III


IMG_3023“Appealing to Heaven for the justice of our cause, we determine to die or be free.”
The Provincial Congress of Massachusetts

The Pine Tree flag, or as I know it, Washington’s Cruisers Flag, was a popular symbol during the revolution, especially in New England. The pine tree was used in flags in New England for over 100 years before the revolution. It was part of the ensign for ships in New England, and the pine tree was used in the flag that flew over Bunker Hill.

On Sundays, I like to fly a flag that represents my Christian faith. Usually, that means the Christian flag. Sometimes, though, when I feel like I really want God to intervene for the sake of our country, I’ll fly Washington’s Cruisers flag as a way to offer an appeal to heaven. Today, that flag flies over downtown Spruce Head America.

Flags of the Revolution Day II

IMG_3013When I bought Spruce Head House, I wanted to continue the flag flying tradition of my father. His father had a flag pole, and I suppose that’s why he had one installed on his property. As I was looking for secondary flags to fly with Ol’ Glory, I happened upon the Sons of Liberty flag. Most of what they stood for seemed to fit with the political leanings of me and wife, and so I bought “her” a Sons of Liberty flag as a gift.

In reality, one might consider The Sons a group of toughs; a gang. While they were a gang for liberty, and so are generally accepted as patriots, their methods were pretty strong arm. The Boston Tea Party was a Sons stunt. Tarring and feathering was done, as well as general beating of someone Brit loyalist who dared cross paths with them. So while I might not agree with their tactics, I agree with their ideals. For those reasons, the Rebellious Stripes fly over downtown Spruce Head America today.

History of the Revolution Through Flags, Day 1 Part II

017OK, technically Ben Frankin’s “Join or Die” cartoon didn’t start off as a flag. And, it didn’t even start off during the Revolution. It predates the revolution, actually. During the time of the Revolution, though, it came back into favor as a cartoon, signifying that if the colonies were going to defeat the British, they would have to stay united.

In our current times, I fly this flag with frequency. As a nation, we’re so divided. “Don’t think people should own an AR-15? You’re not welcome in my restaurant.” “Don’t agree with who I want for president? Unfriend me from Facebook.” Apparently, some people can’t even be friends with someone who doesn’t share their viewpoint. Not very united.

Anyway, today under the Betsy Ross flag, you’ll find Ben’s cartoon-cum-flag in downtown Spruce Head America.

The History of the Revolution Through Flags, Part I

For at least the next four days, the Betsy Ross flag will fly over downtown Spruce Head America. Under it will fly some other historical banner pertaining to the American revolution. Today’s entry will have two parts; this, the first, discussing the Betsy Ross flag, and the second will discuss the flag under it.

The Betsy Ross flag has been attributed to Betsy, but in reality, the details of how the flag with 13 stars arranged in a circle in a canton of blue came to be have been lost. Even if we agree with the story that’s been handed down through family lore, Betsy sewed the flag, but didn’t design it. Her input of the design was limited–according to the family’s own story–to changing the six pointed star to a five pointed; the story is most likely false.

Still, tradition calls this flag the Betsy Ross flag. In this instance, we’ll stick with tradition.

Sidebar: In addition to my interest in history and flag flying, I’m also a stamp collector. Betsy Ross has been honored by the USPS with her own stamp.

Perhaps It’s Time I Got Back Into This

With the popularity of Facebook–for the world, including me–I’ve been neglecting my blog. I suppose not so much neglecting it, as choosing not to use it. Things published on Facebook get to my 600+ friends. Things published here get seen by very few. Of course, what’s published here is available to the world, and not just my “friends.” Some things I’d like to say may be very helpful to the right people, and that audience is probably not on my friends list. Specifically, I’ve been getting back into drumming. I never got away from it; I’ve been playing for the 4+ years I’ve been relatively silent here. But for the last year or so, I’ve been doing some fairly serious practicing. And some of what I’ve been learning and working on may help other drummers–and a drummer in Ontario looking for a Stick Control practice regimen won’t find my routine on Facebook; but they could find me here.

Also, I sometimes like the history of myself, and sometimes like to review it and remember. The Facebook archiving “feature” (if you could even call it that) stinks. Want to find out what you were doing in the fall of 2013 while it’s January 2016? Good luck finding that on Facebook.

So, let’s give this a go for a while, and see if I can keep it up.

The 10 Commandments of the Blues Jam

Nine rules shalt thou follow, and ten shall be a balm unto thy health. Listen, and thou shalt not be as the heathen on stage.

1) If though calleth a tune at the blues jam, you may play of the Chicago or of the Delta.
2) Treadest thou lightly on the R&B and the R&R. Though they be of the offspring of the blues, lo they also be from afar.
3) Amy Winehouse and 4 Non Blondes are right out.
4) When thou callest a tune, thou must callest the key to thy bandmates. The key of C# is an abomination to all. Use it not.
5) If thou needest an ending, look to thy drummer who shall set thee up and lead thee. Do not just stop playing; that is most foul. Givest the bandmates the “cue” by the raising of thy hand, or lifting thy guitar neck to the heaven, and your bandmates shalt follow thee.
6) To the singer/songwriter: The open mic is your domain. You may annointest the people there. Bring not your originals to the blues jam.
7) Thou shalt play nicely with others. The jam is not for your band alone. It is not a showcase for thy group.
8) If thou bringest thy guitar amp to the jam, it shall be of the practice amp size. Thy Marshall shalt thou not bring, neither thy Twin. Turn not the gain to 10 to get “your sound.” Make not thine rhythm section’s ear’s ring; that pleaseth not.
9) If thou playest the harmonica, thou shalt keep them quiet until called to the stage. When the time comest to play your chosen harp, it shalt be in the same key as your brothers.
10) If thou listenest only at the jam, thou shalt offer a sweet offering at the tip jar.

© this day, Eleven July, in the year of our Lord 2015, William of the Rhythm

Quickbooks Won’t Print Invoices

I know I haven’t posted here in a while. Facebook has taken the place of my blog. (Check me out over at facebook.com/billyrhythm) Today, though, I wanted to post a solution I’ve found for a particular Quickbooks problem: Quickbooks won’t print and invoice–either PDF or on paper. Receipts would print. Reports would print. Only invoices wouldn’t print.

What I tried:

  • Restart computer and printer
  • Verify and rebuild Quickbooks data
  • Back up and then restore the company file
  • Download and run the Quickbooks printer preference removal tool
  • Remove and reinstall printer drivers
  • Remove Quickbooks using the Revo uninstaller tool (which also removes all registry entries), and reinstall.

None of that fixed it. What did fix it? Face it, that’s why you’ve read this far. What fixed it was…

…switching to a default Quickbooks invoice template. Yup. The customer was using a custom template. Something there got hosed. Switching back to the default template fixed it.

If that worked for you, please leave a comment.